Tag Archives: Kaena Point

Albatross killings at Kaena Point were slaughters of innocents

Published July 15, 2017 in the “Ocean Watch” column, Honolulu Star-Advertiser ©2017 Susan Scott

On Dec. 27, 2015, two male Punahou students and one alumnus drove to Kaena Point Natural Area Reserve with a baseball bat, machete and air gun and proceeded to butcher 15 Laysan albatrosses, smash their eggs and steal researchers’ equipment. Parts of this atrocity were posted on social media.

There are so many things wrong with that paragraph, it boggles the mind. But one reason so many people are so upset about this planned act of violence is that these are not little-known birds in a run-of-the-mill park. Kaena Point is like a constellation outlining an extraordinary corner of our island, the albatrosses nesting there its twinkling stars.

It was not always so. In 1983, Craig and I walked to Kaena Point to see our first Laysan albatrosses. There we found roaring vehicles tearing around wrecked dunes, spewing sand on hikers and drowning out the sound of the ocean. We were thrilled, however, to find three albatrosses, standing together on a rise, their white chests gleaming in the noonday sun.

And then someone in a pickup shot them. The photo our friend took just before the killing haunts me to this day.

For years I watched the Kaena Point battle between conservationists and off-roaders. When the state piled up boulders to block vehicles, someone would drive a backhoe out there and open a passage.

Eventually the state got big enough rocks, and without trucks the reserve quickly began to blossom with native plants and animals. A few albatrosses chose to nest there, and gradually a colony was reborn.

Private and public workers have worked diligently for decades to protect and improve Kaena Point, and today it’s a must-see place for both visitors and residents.

Besides being angry over the criminals’ defilement of this special place, we albatross admirers are outraged over the slaughter because bludgeoning albatrosses is like bludgeoning golden retriever puppies.

Laysan albatrosses evolved with no land predators and therefore are not afraid of humans, making the birds a delightful blend of tame and wild. At Midway a curious albatross once untied my shoelaces as I stood talking. When I squatted down to take a picture, another bird pulled a tissue from my gaping pocket.

While working at Tern Island, I once wrote the following: “Cradling a Laysan albatross in my arms was a joy like no other, the bird’s feathers so soft that my work-calloused hands could barely feel them. But my lips could. When it was my turn to hold, I would lower my face to the bird’s head, inhale its fresh smell of the open ocean, and press my lips to its velvety feathers. With this touch, I delivered to the bird a message: You are magnificent and I adore you.”

The Kaena Point incident is a stark contrast to the aloha spirit we enjoy in Hawaii, but the sentencing is done and it’s time to move on. I look forward to November when our albatrosses return to Kaena Point and once again I can walk in the cluster of our island’s brilliant stars.

Kaena Point is hard to beat for watching nature’s glory

Published November 25, 2013 in the “Ocean Watch” column, Honolulu Star-Advertiser ©2013 Susan Scott

A Hawaiian monk seal basked at Kaena Point last week. ©2013 Susan Scott

Last week I hikedto Kaena Point, a daylong excursion (about a one-hour drive from Honolulu, and a 5-mile round-trip hike). A few days later I got a text from a friend: “Hiking to Kaena Point. Wanna come?”

Leaving Oahu’s mass of buildings and lines of vehicles and walking into that world-class wildlife sanctuary had been like stepping through a magic wardrobe. Could I turn down another such journey? Of course not. I accepted instantly.

In the 1980s the state banned motorized vehicles from the 59-acre space to allow the plants and animals of this rare dune ecosystem (one of the last in the main Hawaiian Islands) to recover. And that they did, especially after the 2011 installation of a cat/rat/mongoose-resistant fence.

During my visits, Laysan albatrosses worked the wind, soaring as only albatrosses can. Other albatross parents had already hunkered down on newly laid eggs, and a few were singing and dancing in their search for mates. About 400 of these native seabirds spend the nesting season at Kaena Point, and the numbers continue to grow.

laysanchick

Wedge-Tailed Shearwater chick. ©2013 Susan Scott

Layman Albatross. ©2013 Scott R. Davis

Layman Albatross. ©2013 Scott R. Davis

 Wedge-tailed shearwaters (the “wedgies” I wrote about two weeks ago) also nest here. Full grown but still downy, chicks are emerging from their underground burrows, blinking in the bright sun. The youngsters are gearing up for the big leap, their first flight to the sea.

Kaena Point is also an ideal place to watch humpback whales and winter waves. Besides the beauty of big surf, the 20-foot-tall waves pounding the shore during my first visit caused four Hawaiian monk seals to choose a sleeping place exceptionally high on the beach. Several residents and visitors, a monk seal expert and 91 Punahou students admired the seals from a respectful distance. (To read about Kaena Point’s seals, and others spotted around the islands, see monksealmania.blogspot.com.)

Kaena Point

©2013 Susan Scott

This westernmost corner of Oahu gets our youngsters out hiking and, at the same time, teaches in the best way: by showing rather than telling. A troop of Kame­ha­meha students arrived as we left.

A sparkling diamond on the pinkie finger of Oahu, Kaena Point proves that given protection from vehicles and introduced predators, wildlife and humans can, even on a crowded island, coexist.

This special state preserve is a good place to visit any time, but especially so this week of Thanksgiving. If anything on this island makes me feel thankful to be alive, healthy and living on Oahu, it’s the precious point we call Kaena.

I’m already planning my next trip.

monk seal

Juvenile Monk Seal, Kaena Point. ©2013 Scott R. Davis


Marine biologist Susan Scott writes the newspaper column, “Ocean
Watch”, for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, www.staradvertiser.com

©2013 Susan Scott

Kaena Point is cleaner, safer than it was before

Published February 3, 1997 in the “Ocean Watch” column, Honolulu Star-Advertiser ©1997 Susan Scott

 Last week, I took some family members on a hike to Kaena Point. This was my first visit there since my car was trashed in the parking lot a year ago. Determined not to let paranoia spoil the walk, I removed everything from the car, left the doors unlocked and headed down the road.

My precautions were probably unnecessary because changes have occurred in this state park over the past year. Neat boulders line the parking lot and beginning of the trail, prominent signs forbid littering and motor vehicle riding, and the area looked cleaner than I had seen it.

Most important, the new Kaena Point ambassador, Reuben Mateo, was an obvious presence. When I met him, he was sitting near the entrance of the park greeting visitors in his state pickup.

I complimented him on the improvements. “I haven’t done much,” he said. “I’ve only been here two months.”

Still, the attendance of this friendly man with the big smile made all the difference. The message is that this jewel of a park is worth spending some money and effort to protect.

Mateo agreed that the number of vehicles in the park is still a problem. A future permit system may fix that.

But my family and I didn’t dwell on the noise and dust of the trucks and vans. We hiked past them in a brisk two-mile walk, then entered the nature park. There we enjoyed one of the best whale shows I’ve ever seen from shore.

Several groups of humpback whales were as active as they get. Two whales held their pectoral fins high out of the water as if “sailing” in the strong winds. Several others began tail-slapping. Others occasionally leaped from the water in spectacular breaches.

What a show it was, made even better by our having viewed the new IMAX film “Whales” the night before in Waikiki. “I’m so glad we saw that movie,” my sister said as we watched one whale slap its tail on the surface over and over. “Now I know what’s going on under the water too.”

The film, produced and partly written by former Waikiki Aquarium director Leighton Taylor, is well worth seeing. The footage of Hawaii’s humpbacks, both here and in their summer Alaska feeding grounds, is superb. The exciting coverage of right whales reminded me that there are other whales in the world to visit. Argentina’s Peninsula Valdez is now on my list of must-see places.

Kaena Point is a must-see place too, and not only for humpbacks. When we could finally tear our eyes from the sea, we discovered that other marine animals were practically sitting at our feet.

A group of Laysan albatrosses stood on a hill singing and dancing up a storm. We lowered our voices and kept our distance so as not to disturb them. Then along came a family with a big dog on the loose. We cringed, hoping it would not find and kill the albatross sitting on an egg near the path.

Such deaths will continue until people stop bringing unleashed dogs into the park.

I wished there was some way to shoo the courting albatrosses to the other side of the island. There, off Sea Life Park, private and public agencies have set up a little seabird paradise at Kaohikaipu Island.

On our way home, goat-like braying echoed from the cliffs above. These are the unusual calls of white-tailed tropic birds nesting on the mountainside. Despite years of looking, I have never seen one of these seabirds here.

This day was different. When I looked up, I spotted one of these lovely white birds flying toward the ocean.

“Now I understand why you like to hike so much,” my sister said when we returned to my untouched car. “With places like this around, walking is really fun.”

Walking to Kaena Point is fun. And with increased protection, it’s getting better all the time.

 

No fooling – government must make trailheads safe

Published April 1, 2013 in the “Ocean Watch” column, Honolulu Star-Advertiser ©1996 Susan Scott

LAST week, after several frustrating computer crashes, I decided to treat myself to a hike at Kaena Point Nature Park. I drove my car to the end of the road where I parked in a clean, paved stall.

As I got out of the car, a police officer patrolling the area on a bicycle greeted me.

Quietly, we discussed the beauty of this exquisite wilderness. Moments later, I started my hike with a feeling of gratitude that such a serene place exists on this otherwise frenzied island.

APRIL FOOL!

Here’s the real story: Last week after several frustrating computer crashes, I treated myself to a hike at Kaena Point Nature Park.

When I arrived at the trailhead, I felt even more depressed. Broken glass lay everywhere in the pitted, dirt field. Motorcycles and four-wheel-drive vehicles charged unrestrained around the so-called gate, creating such a racket that I had to shout to a friend standing right next to me to be heard.

IT took more than two miles of walking to get away from the dust, smoke and noise. We returned to the car a couple hours later, covered in red dirt – as was my car. The dirt was so thick, I couldn’t see through the windows to drive. After a pathetic attempt to clean them, I grumped home, both car and driver filthy.

“It’s just the weekend,” I rationalized. “I should only go out there on weekdays, when it’s quieter.”

So I did, a few days later. It’s true there were fewer trucks and no dirt bikes barreling around inside the gate. This time, however, I came back to my car to find that I could see out the window just fine – because it was gone. So was every single item in the car.

I drove home in a sea of broken glass and called police. They wouldn’t come to my North Shore house. Why?

“You wouldn’t believe the number of break-ins like this that happen out there. We can’t possibly come for each one,” I was told.

Uh, isn’t there a clue there? I wondered out loud. The officer sighed and I knew what was coming: not enough money; not enough officers.

THE good part of this wretched story is that on both hikes, after I got through the vehicular battlefield and before I found my car trashed, I fully enjoyed myself.

At the far end of Kaena is a true pot of gold. This small section of preserve lies behind a real barrier, not a pretend one, and holds a wonderland of native plants and animals.

What was once wasteland now blooms. I watched a monk seal snooze on the beach there and saw courting Laysan albatrosses dance. Just offshore, baby humpback whales entertained me with playful breaches.

There’s no arguing that Kaena Point is a jewel, a marvel of rebounding nature. But how can residents or visitors enjoy it? People here on the North Shore just shake their heads when I say my car was vandalized at Kaena Point.

“You left it THERE?” they say. Then they tell me a worse story of what happened to their car at some other trailhead.

THIS is the third car hit in my family in a year and a half. The worst two were at trailheads. What do we do now? Stop hiking? Rent a car when we go on a hike? Hire a guard? Not one of these ideas is reasonable.

What is reasonable is for government agencies to work together to enforce gate rules and make trailheads safe. I know funds are tight. But what good does it do to spend money on pseudo-barriers when people can easily drive around them? And how can we taxpayers justify spending money to maintain nature parks that we’re afraid to use?

I am appalled at how many people pointed out how lucky I am that the brick was thrown at my car window instead of at my head.

Clean, safe parks and trailheads on Oahu should not be an April Fool’s joke.


Marine biologist Susan Scott writes the newspaper column, “Ocean Watch”,
for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, www.starbulletin.com